The Story of “Jimmy” and the Jimmy Fund

Jimmy Fund pic

Jimmy Fund
Image: jimmyfund.org

While vice president and general manager of the American Superconductor Corporation Wires Business Unit, Angelo Robert Santamaria developed the first manufacturing capability for a commercially available wire superconductor. In addition to his work with American Superconductor and other engineering companies like Oasys Water and Panelclaw, Angelo R. Santamaria supports the Jimmy Fund.

Founded in 1948, the Jimmy Fund was created when the Variety Club of New England held a radio broadcast featuring Dr. Sidney Farber’s 12-year-old leukemia patient Einar (Jimmy) Gustafson. During the broadcast, the Boston Braves baseball team –Gustafson’s heroes–visited him in the hospital. The show had asked listeners to donate funds for a TV set so that Jimmy could watch Braves games, but surpassed its goal and raised more than $200,000. From there, the Jimmy Fund transformed from a one-time good will effort into a fundraising organization dedicated to supporting the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Sidney Farber founded the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and played an instrumental role in developing the modern chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Gustafson, called “Jimmy” to safeguard his identity, went on to appear at many of the foundation’s early events. After he withdrew, the public assumed he had died, as prognoses for children with cancer were dire at the time. In truth, Gustafson survived his cancer and went on to have children and grandchildren. He returned to the public eye on the 50th anniversary of that initial radio show and received recognition as an honorary Jimmy Fund chairman.

Three Ways to Contribute to the Jimmy Fund

Jimmy Fund pic

Jimmy Fund
Image: jimmyfund.org

Angelo Santamaria has 20 years of experience as a business leader and global manufacturing professional, and previously held the position of senior vice president of global manufacturing operations for the American Superconductor. Outside of his work, Angelo Santamaria gives back to the community through the support of charitable initiatives like the Jimmy Fund.

The Jimmy Fund is an organization that raises money for cancer research to support the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. Interested parties can contribute by volunteering, participating, and donating.

Jimmy Fund volunteers complete many valuable tasks, such as working at fundraising events and helping with tasks at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In addition to giving their time, some volunteers also sign up to donate blood or bone marrow.

The Jimmy Fund hosts fundraising events throughout the year for people of all ages and abilities. The organization offers an event finder tool via its website to match willing participants with fundraising events that suit their personal interests and passions.

It’s simple to donate funds directly to the charity through its online portal, and donors have the option of directing their donations to a specific area of research or in honor of a loved one.

Fresh Water is More Important Today than Ever

Oasys Water pic

Oasys Water
Image: OasysWater.com

Angelo Robert Santamaria is a business executive who formerly worked for the American Superconductor in Devens, Massachusetts. In his most recent position, Angelo R. Santamaria operated as the vice president of global manufacturing operations for the forward osmosis technology company, Oasys Water.

Oasys Water focuses on the provision of forward osmosis technology to treat industrial wastewater in the United States and China. The company’s aim is to use creative solutions for high recovery desalination to supplement the world’s diminishing supply of fresh water.

Though scientists and researchers have no definite way to determine the future of the world’s natural water resources, factors such as climate change and increasing demand from a growing world population are projected to create a scarcity of fresh water. In the last several years, drought, overuse of natural resources, and rising temperatures have caused fresh water problems for people in many countries, including Brazil, Iran, and the United States. Data collected by the UN suggests that current water usage trends are unsustainable. They project that in the next 13 years, the world will only maintain three-fifths of the amount of water that it needs if current methods of use continue.